Articles Posted in Car Accidents

In 2020, 29% of 808 fatal collisions in Indiana involved dangerous driving, a category that includes speeding. 72% of all dangerous driving collisions included speeding as at least one factor, and speeding was involved in 9% of all collisions regardless of the ultimate cause. While speeding instances have decreased from 2016 to 2020, they remain a significant cause for loss of life while driving—and the cause is almost entirely controllable. And preliminary data unfortunately shows that traffic fatalities in Indiana are up year over year.

According to recent reports, a young woman has died at the scene of a 6-car crash in Indiana. A Cadillac SUV was speeding when it rear-ended the GMC SUV driven by the woman, who was stopped at a red light. The GMC was pushed into the rear of a third vehicle and all three cars were shoved through the intersection. Three other cars were involved in secondary crashes stemming from the accident. The woman has been identified as a local middle school teacher and is mourned by her students and fellow faculty, as well as her husband of just four months.

Two others were taken to the hospital with injuries from the accident, and many others involved in the crash suffered pain but did not go to the hospital. One person sustained a minor head injury and is expected to recover. The second person taken to the hospital was trapped in their vehicle unconscious and was taken to the hospital via helicopter for severe head and internal injuries. An investigation is ongoing.

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While many road accidents can result in serious injury, head-on collisions are particularly dangerous. These collisions occur when a driver crosses a dividing line between lanes, veering into oncoming traffic. When the front of two vehicles strike one another, the force of the collision can often result in serious injury or even death.

For example, a recent news article reported that two drivers died following a head-on collision in Fortville, Indiana. According to the article, the driver of one vehicle traveled to the left, crossing the center dividing line between lanes. She then collided with a driver in the opposite lane head-on. Both drivers died from their injuries.

What Are the Causes of a Head-On Collision?

There are many situations on the road that can lead to a head-on collision, but two contributing factors may be distracted driving and speeding. Drivers who do not keep their eyes on the road may veer into another lane and collide head-on with another vehicle. Distracted driving can often take the form of “multi-tasking,” such as talking on the phone, eating, or applying makeup while operating a vehicle. Unfortunately, multi-tasking can cause drivers to pay too little attention to the road in front of them, leading to a tragic and avoidable accident. To avoid a head-on collision, avoid performing activities that distract you from the road.

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From July 2020—July 2021, U.S. drivers reported 2.1 million animal collision insurance claims, according to the Insurance Information Institute. During deer season, which lasts from October through December, a significant increase occurs in the movement of the deer population. As they move to a new location, many deer end up on highways and local roads. Consequently, more car accidents involving deer occur during deer season than any other time of year. In addition to deer-vehicle collisions, multi-vehicle collisions can also result from deer crossing the road. When drivers see a deer approaching the road, their natural instinct may be to swerve out of the way. Unfortunately, swerving into another lane can lead to a collision with another vehicle, which may be fatal.

As a recent news article reported, a multi-vehicle accident involving a deer left three people dead and two injured in St. Joseph County, Indiana. As an SUV traveled westbound at nighttime, the driver struck a deer. To avoid the deer, the SUV driver crossed over the center median of the road. The SUV then collided with a pickup truck driving eastbound. Both the driver and passenger of the SUV died at the scene of the crash, along with the front seat passenger of the pickup truck. The pickup truck driver and back seat passenger suffered serious injuries and were transported to the hospital.

How Do I Avoid Collisions with a Deer or Another Vehicle?

If you see a deer ahead of you on the road, avoid the urge to swerve into the opposite lane. Otherwise, you may be at risk of colliding with another vehicle or losing control of your car. If there is a shoulder on the highway, try to pull over instead. This way, you can avoid hitting the deer without placing yourself and other drivers at risk of injury or death. Additionally, if you notice a deer on the road before you approach, you may have more time to stop and pull over. To spot deer on the road as early as possible, make sure to pay attention to the road and avoid distracted driving. If you are driving at night, use your headlights to ensure you can see the road in front of you.

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Children depend on their parents, caregivers, and other drivers and road users to ensure that they make it to their destinations safely. Whether that involves a quick trip to soccer practice or to school, it is essential that children are safely secured in vehicles. Seatbelts save lives. According to the CDC, 608 child passengers age 12 and under died in motor vehicle crashes in 2019. Of the children 12 and under who died in crashes for whom restraint use was known, 38 percent were not properly restrained.

In 2019, the CDC further reports that 67% of fatally injured children riding with unbelted drivers were also unrestrained. An estimated 46% of car seats and booster seats are misused, according to the CDC, and this misuse of car seats and booster seats can reduce their effectiveness. Taking the time to ensure that as the driver, you are properly restrained, and that other passengers and children are properly restrained before pulling off can be lifesaving, and parents and caregivers should be sure to do so with each drive.

A recent report made it apparent the importance of properly restraining children and other riders while in motor vehicles. Ten children survived a violent crash in Indiana after a 65-year-old driver of a pickup truck was traveling east on a road, failed to yield the right-of-way to a passenger van that was traveling north. As a result, the van crashed into the side of the truck, splitting the truck in half. There were 10 children in the van who were properly restrained and suffered minor injuries despite the severity of the crash. The children ranged from 6 months in age to 15 years old. Police believe that the driver that failed to yield may have been under the influence of alcohol at the time of the crash. Further investigations will be made.

When drivers are on the road late at night or early in the morning, additional factors may be present that make serious accidents or collisions more likely than during the daytime. Drivers are more likely to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol late at night, contributing to slow response times and poor decision-making. In addition, drivers may have been up late or driving through the night, and lack of sleep or increased levels of exhaustion can contribute to unsafe conditions on the road.

A recent article has reported that Indiana State Police responded to a car crash on I-80 in Indiana at the early morning hour of 2:22 am. Two people were severely injured when an SUV attempted to improperly pass a semi-truck and struck the crash attenuator and then the semi-truck. Three people in the crash, including the semi-truck driver, were unharmed, but two were transported to the hospital for life-threatening injuries. An investigation is still underway and no charges have been brought, but police say they suspect drugs or alcohol may have been involved in the accident.

If someone has been injured in a car accident and a non-injured party was under the influence of drugs or alcohol, the injured person or their families and loved ones may be able to more easily bring a personal injury claim and receive compensation.

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The National Center for Statistics and Analysis and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that head-on accidents are disproportionately represented in deadly crashes on two-lane highways. These two-lane roadways make up a substantial percentage of the highway network in the country; Indiana alone has nearly 30,000 miles of road. Thus, motorists must take steps to avoid highway crashes, especially since many of these crashes are head-on.

Many organizations and safety advocates have researched to help curtail head-on crashes. However, these accidents continue to occur. While the rate of head-on accidents is not as high as other types of accidents, these crashes tend to result in the most severe outcomes.

For instance, local news sources reported a fatal Knightstown, Indiana crash. According to the Sheriff’s Office, a driver was killed when he veered into the center line while heading south toward 1-70. He slammed into a northbound driver in an SUV and eventually came to a stop in a ditch. The driver was trapped in his vehicle and died from his injuries before an emergency helicopter arrived. The SUV’s driver’s vehicle ignited and came to a rest in another ditch. Emergency responders transported her to a regional hospital for treatment.

After a fatal Indiana car accident, you may feel overwhelmed with the aftermath of the collision and feel unsure of what steps to take next. If medical expenses, bills, and other financial pressures are stacking up in the wake of losing a loved one, it may be time to consider filing a personal injury lawsuit against the at-fault party. Although the lawsuit will not bring your loved one back, it could provide some financial reprieve for you and your loved ones on your journey to healing.

According to a recent local news report, a man was charged with driving while intoxicated after a fatal Indiana crash that took place last March. Indiana State Police reported that the March accident was a single-vehicle accident, where a Jeep Cherokee crashed into a median wall and overturned. The driver of the Jeep had two passengers in the vehicle, one of which died from injuries stemming from the accident. The Jeep driver was charged with operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated and causing death and causing death when operating a motor vehicle with an alcohol concentration equivalent of 0.08 or more.

If you recently lost a loved one in a fatal Indiana car accident and the at-fault party may have been intoxicated or driving under the influence, you may be entitled to compensation. Because your loved one’s death was likely because of the at-fault party’s recklessness and negligence, this could establish the basis for your personal injury claim.

As if getting into a car accident was not stressful enough, watching the at-fault party speed away from the scene of the accident without stopping and being unable to locate them makes an already challenging situation even more frustrating. These accidents, which usually involve a vehicle crashing into another party or property before fleeing the scene, can be devastating to victims and property owners. Understanding what legal and insurance-related avenues you have available to you to recover compensation following one of these accidents is crucial to getting you back on your feet.

According to a recent news report, the victim of a hit-and-run accident was identified. Local officials reported finding the victim’s body in a drainage ditch more than a mile from where her car was found crashed and empty on the side of the road earlier this month. Initially, police claimed it was impossible that she had floated that far between the locations, but the coroner’s office officially determined that her death was due to trauma from the car accident complicated by drowning. Additional details surrounding the crash remain under investigation, but the victim’s death was ruled an accident. The circumstances surrounding the collision remain under investigation.

In Indiana, like most other states, there are specific laws prohibiting leaving the scene of an accident and causing a hit-and-run collision. If the at-fault party is located, the victim of the accident has two options: first, to make a claim against their insurance, or second, to file a personal injury lawsuit against them.

Distracted driving seems more common than ever these days—probably because there are so many more things to distract drivers than ever before. From texting and talking on cell phones to wrangling the kids or attempting to multi-task while driving, taking your focus off the road can often have significant and disastrous consequences for yourself, your passengers, and others who share the road with you. Following an accident where a distracted driver’s negligence causes you significant physical injury and property damage, understanding the law is crucial so that you can recover the compensation that you deserve.

According to a recent local news report, four people were injured following a two-vehicle accident. Local authorities reported that a Dodge was traveling east when the driver handed her daughter a drink that was in the backseat. The driver ran off the south side of the roadway and then overcorrected, which caused the vehicle to swerve into the westbound lane. The driver of a Chevrolet was traveling west when she crashed into the Dodge as it swung into her lane. The driver of the Dodge and her two passengers were transported to a local hospital for treatment of back, leg, and hand injuries. The driver of the Chevrolet suffered a chest injury and was also transferred to a hospital for treatment. The accident remains under investigation.

Unfortunately, Indiana is no stranger to similar types of distracted driving incidents. In fact, in 2018, more than 6,000 accidents involved a distracted driver. In 2020, Indiana became the 22nd state in the country to enact legislation prohibiting drivers from holding a smartphone or similar device while operating a vehicle. The law, however, only prohibits drivers from holding the device, so they are still permitted to use hands-free and Bluetooth devices.

Traffic accidents are one of the primary causes of serious injuries for individuals throughout the United States. The likelihood of a fatality exponentially increases when a driver is under the influence of drugs or alcohol. For instance, a local news report described a fatal Indiana suspected drunk driving accident. According to the Indiana Metropolitan Police Department (IMPD), the crash occurred shortly before 10 a.m. at an intersection near Interstate 465. A 27-year-old southbound driver hit a west-bound Fiat driver. Both vehicles sustained severe damages in the crash. Emergency responders transported the Fiat driver to a hospital, where she succumbed to injuries. The other driver suffered non-life-threatening injuries after being ejected from his SUV. IMPD investigators arrested the SUV driver on suspicion of driving while intoxicated and reckless homicide; however, charges are pending.

After an Indiana drunk driving accident, the injury victim may not need to prove that the other party was intoxicated to establish that they were negligent. However, proving intoxication can assist victims in recovering more compensation efficiently. The burden on establishing intoxication after an accident should not remain on an accident victim; however, taking note of certain factors can help bolster a case. For example, when exchanging information, a victim should take note of the other driver’s:

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